Since the start of the space race in the 60’s, the price of reaching lower earth orbit (LEO) has been in the $10,000 to $100,000 per kg range. With the notable exception of the Saturn V (the rocket that took us to the moon) nearing $5,000/kg.

Then SpaceX came to town, and since, the price has been plummeting: The Falcon 9 delivers to LEO for $2800/kg, Falcon Heavy for $1400/kg, and Starship with a projected $50/kg. This is the story of SpaceX’s accomplishments.

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Price of sending 1kg to Lower Earth Orbit (LEO), Inflation Adjusted to 2020 USD. Source

Oh and btw, this is to LEO (upload) and not LEO to Earth (download). The download bandwidth remains very limited. Why would you want to “download”? That’s a future post.


In 2019 Uber’s CEO Dara Khosrowshahi unveiled their plans to build an “operating system for everyday life”. A vision where Uber would facilitate bringing things to you through Uber Eats and Uber Freight, as well as enable you to move around the city, be it through cars, electric scooters, autonomous vehicles, and even helicopters.

Cue the year 2020, the company suffered a 73% drop in bookings in Q2 and had to let go 25% of its workforce during the start of the pandemic. …


By now we are all familiar with the growth story of TikTok and how it grew way faster than all western social networks, now Chinese EV stocks have been on a massive bull run and yesterday, possibly the most hyped EV company -NIO- announced their 2020 Q3 results:

Sales increased 147% YoY, margins finally went positive, all that good stuff.

But how does young NIO compare to Tesla’s early days? The deliveries per quarter tells the growth story:

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Deliveries Data: Link

After 10 quarters of deliveries, NIO is sitting at a rate of 12.2k deliveries per quarter, this is in contrast to Tesla’s…


Since the pandemic started, there’s been approximately 61,260 tech layoffs [1]. Close to 30% of the layoffs came from public tech companies, 85% of those companies are unprofitable.

All US-based publicly traded tech companies that have announced layoffs in 2020, plus their revenue and operations net income
All US-based publicly traded tech companies that have announced layoffs in 2020, plus their revenue and operations net income
All of the US-based publicly traded tech companies that have announced layoffs in 2020, plus their revenues and net operation profits (loss) for Q1 2020 and 2019 [2].

No deep insights here, just the simple fact that the once growth hyper focused startups grew to be publicly traded companies without ever sorting their unit economics, and now their mediocracy has real consequences on real people.

This includes household names such as Uber, Lyft, Casper, and Eventbrite which we’ve all used, and begs the question: why did we allow so many unprofitable companies IPO?


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Atlas: Watfly’s single-seat VTOL aircraft

Flight is the most effective means of transportation. That is why the President flies around in a helicopter, celebrities in private jets, and why critical patients are flown in air ambulances. Still, personal flight remains a luxury, and for the rest of us, transportation means roads and soul-crushing traffic.

To democratize flight, we need flying cars. That is, an aircraft that is similar to a car: affordable to most, as easy to pilot as cars are to drive, as safe as commercial air travel, and with convenient, practical use. …


Testing

One, two…

Gonzalo Espinoza Graham

I was born in a developing country, in the awkward years between millennials and Gen-Z. Thus I am obsessed with generational shifts and the developing world.

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